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Linux Plumbers Conference Matrix and BBB integration

The recently completed Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) 2021 used the Big Blue Button (BBB) project again as its audio/video online conferencing platform and Matrix for IM and chat. Why we chose BBB has been discussed previously. However this year we replaced RocketChat with Matrix to achieve federation, allowing non-registered conference attendees to join the chat. Also, based on feedback from our attendees, we endeavored to replace the BBB chat window with a Matrix one so anyone could see and participate in one contemporaneous chat stream within BBB and beyond. This enabled chat to be available before, during and after each session.

One thing that emerged from our initial disaster with Matrix on the first day is that we failed to learn from the experiences of other open source conferences (i.e. FOSDEM, which used Matrix and ran into the same problems). So, an object of this post is to document for posterity what we did and how to repeat it.

Integrating Matrix Chat into BBB

Most of this integration was done by Guy Lunardi.

It turns out that Chat is fairly deeply embedded into BBB, so replacing the existing chat module is hard. Fortunately, BBB also contains an embedded etherpad which is simply produced via an iFrame redirection. So what we did is to disable the BBB chat panel and replace it with a new iFrame based component that opened an embedded Matrix chat client. The client we chose was riot-embedded, which is a relatively recent project but seemed to work reasonably well. The final problem was to pass through user credentials. Up until three days before the conference, we had been happy with the embedded Matrix client simply creating a one-time numbered guest account every time it was opened, but we worried about this being a security risk and so implemented pass through login credentials at the last minute (life’s no fun unless you live dangerously).

Our custom front end for BBB (lpcfe) was created last year by Jon Corbet. It uses a fairly simple email/registration confirmation code for username/password via LDAP. The lpcfe front end Jon created is here git://git.lwn.net/lpcfe.git; it manages the whole of the conference log in process and presents the current and future sessions (with join buttons) according to the timezone of the browser viewing it.

The credentials are passed through directly using extra parameters to BBB (see commit fc3976e “Pass email and regcode through to BBB”). We eventually passed these through using a GET request. Obviously if we were using a secret password, this would be a problem, but since the password was a registration code handed out by a third party, it’s acceptable. I imagine if anyone wishes to take this work forward, add native Matrix device/session support in riot-embedded would be better.

The main change to get this working in riot-embedded is here, and the supporting patch to BBB is here.

Note that the Matrix room ID used by the client was added as an extra parameter to the flat text file that drives the conference track layout of lpcfe. All Matrix rooms were created as public (and published) so anyone going to our :lpc.events matrix domain could see and join them.

Setting up Matrix for the Conference

We used the matrix-synapse server and did a standard python venv pip install on Ubuntu of the latest tag. We created around 30+ public rooms: one for each Microconference and track of the conference and some admin and hallway rooms. We used LDAP to feed the authentication portion of lpcfe/Matrix, but we had a problem using email addresses since the standard matrix user name cannot have an ‘@’ symbol in it. Eventually we opted to transform everyone’s email to a matrix compatible form simply by replacing the ‘@’ with a ‘.’, which is why everyone in our conference appeared with ridiculously long matrix user names like @jejb.ibm.com:lpc.events

This ‘@’ to ‘.’ transformation was a huge source of problems due to the unwillingness of engineers to read instructions, so if we do this over again, we’ll do the transformation silently in the login javascript of our Matrix web client. (we did this in riot-embedded but ran out of time to do it in Element web as well).

Because we used LDAP, the actual matrix account for each user was created the first time they log into our server, so we chose at this point to use auto-join to add everyone to the 30+ LPC Matrix rooms we’d already created. This turned out to be a huge problem.

Testing our Matrix and BBB integration

We tried to organize a “Town Hall” event where we invited lots of people to test out the infrastructure we’d be using for the conference. Because we wanted this to be open, we couldn’t use the pre-registration/LDAP authentication infrastructure so Jon quickly implemented a guest mode (and we didn’t auto join anyone to any Matrix rooms other than the townhall chat).

In the end we got about 220 users to test during which time the Matrix and BBB infrastructure behaved quite well. Based on this test, we chose a 2 vCPU Linode VM for our Matrix server.

What happened on the Day

Come the Monday of the conference, the first problem we ran into was procrastination: the conference registered about 1,000 attendees, of whom, about 500 tried to log on about 5 minutes prior to the first session. Since accounts were created and rooms joined upon the first login, this is clearly a huge thundering herd problem of our own making … oops. The Matrix server itself shot up to 100% CPU on the python synapse process and simply stayed there, adding new users at a rate of about one every 30 seconds. All the chat tabs froze because logins were taking ages as well. The first thing we did was to scale the server up to a 16 CPU bare metal system, but that didn’t help because synapse is single threaded … all we got was the matrix synapse python process running at 100% one one of the CPUs, still taking 30 seconds per first log in.

Fixing the First Day problems

The first thing we realized is we had to multi-thread the synapse server. This is well known but the issue is also quite well hidden deep in the Matrix documents. It also happens that the Matrix documents are slightly incomplete. The first scaling attempt we tried: simply adding 16 generic worker apps to scale across all our physical CPUs failed because the Matrix server stopped federating and then the database crashed with “FATAL: remaining connection slots are reserved for non-replication superuser connections”.

Fixing the connection problem (alter system set max_connections = 1000;) triggered a shared memory too small issue which was eventually fixed by bumping the shared buffer segment to 8GB (alter system set shared_buffers=1024000;). I suspect these parameters were way too large, but the Linode we were on had 32GB of main memory, so fine tuning in this emergency didn’t seem a good use of time.

Fixing the worker problem was way more complex. The way Matrix works, you have to use a haproxy to redirect incoming connections to individual workers and you have to ensure that the same worker always services the same transaction (which you achieve by hashing on IP address). We got a lot of advice from FOSDEM on this aspect, but in the end, instead of using an external haproxy, we went for the built in forward proxy load balancing in nginx. The federation problem seems to be that Matrix simply doesn’t work without a federation sender. In the end, we created 15 generic workers and one each of media server, frontend server and federation sender.

Our configuration files are

once you have all the units enabled in systemd, you can then simply do systemctl start/stop matrix-synapse.target

Finally, to fix the thundering herd problem (for people who hadn’t already logged in), we ran through the entire spreadsheet of email/confirmation numbers doing an automatic login using the user management API on the server itself. At this point we had about half the accounts auto created, so this script created the rest.

emaillist=lpc2021-all-attendees.txt
IFS='   '

while read first last confirmation email; do
    bbblogin=${email/+*@/@}
    matrixlogin=${bbblogin/@/.}
    curl -XPOST -d '{"type":"m.login.password", "user":"'${matrixlogin}'", "password":"'${confirmation}'"}' "http://localhost:8008/_matrix/client/r0/login"
    sleep 1
done < ${emaillist}

The lpc2021-all-attendees.txt is a tab separated text file used to drive the mass mailings to plumbers attendees, but we adapted it to log everyone in to the matrix server.

Conclusion

With the above modifications, the matrix server on a Dedicated 32GB (16 cores) Linode ran smoothly for the rest of the conference. The peak load got to 17 and the peak total CPU usage never got above 70%. Finally, the peak memory usage was around 16GB including cache (so the server was a bit over provisioned).

In the end, 878 of the 944 registered attendees logged into our BBB servers at one time or another and we got a further 100 external matrix users (who may or may not also have had a conference account).

The Community Corrosive Effects of CLAs

As one of the kernel DCO advocates, I’ve written many times about using the DCO instead of a CLA for copyright and patent contributions under open source licences. In spite of my obvious biases, I’ll try to give a factual overview of the cases for the DCO and CLA system. First, it should be noted that both the DCO and any CLA are types of Contribution Agreements (a set of terms by which contributors are agreeing to be bound). It should also be acknowledged that the DCO is a far more recent invention than CLAs. The DCO was first pioneered by the Linux kernel in 2004 (having been designed by Diane Peters, then of OSDL) and was subsequently adopted by a broad range of open source projects. However, in legal terms, the DCO is much less well understood than a standard CLA type agreement between the contributor and some entity, which is largely the reason you find a number of lawyers still advocating for the use of CLAs in various open source projects: because they’d like to stick with something that has more miles on it, or because they’re invested in the older model of community, largely pioneered by Apache. The biggest problem today is that the operation of most CLAs is asymmetrical: they take from the contributor more rights than the open source code actually needs, so lets begin with a summary of each type of Contribution Agreement.

DCO

The DCO is a legal representation by the contributor to everyone who might ever use the code. It requires no second party on the other side to counter sign it or act as the receiving entity, so it exactly mirrors the inbound=outbound licensing model first coined by Richard Fontana. The DCO explicitly grants to all downstream recipients only the exact rights the Open Source licence requires (and nothing more). In this sense it is fully symmetrical: the rights granted by the contributor are the same as the rights received by the downstream (i.e. inbound=outbound). Every contributor under the DCO retains their own copyright (or their company does if the contribution is a work for hire). The main alleged disadvantage of the DCO is that it encourages distributed ownership and makes it very hard to change the licence of the project because each contributor has only granted the rights necessary for the current licence, so if the new one requires more or different rights, all the current contributors have to re-grant those new or different rights (which can be a huge number of people for large long running projects). Since the DCO is a representation to everyone and requires no receiving entity, the project collecting the code doesn’t require any formal legal entity, like a foundation, to operate and thus the DCO gives rise to a truly lightweight structure for any project. The other big advantage of the DCO is that all of the representations are tracked by the Signed-off-by: tag on the commit, which goes in the git repository of the project code, so anyone with a clone of the repository has complete access to information about who changed what and where their DCO signoff is.

CLA

All current Open Source CLAs are structured as agreements between the contributor and a second party. Most often, the second party is a Foundation or a Corporation, making them quite heavy weight in terms of setup, admin and overhead. Every current CLA that I know about takes more rights from the contributor than the open source licence actually requires. For instance the Apache Individual CLA grants the right to copy, derive and sublicence to the Apache foundation who then relicence the contribution to the project usually under the Apache 2.0 licence. This is a classic asymmetric grant because the Apache foundation receives far more rights in the contribution than it grants to the downstream recipients. The FSF CLA is even more extreme because they require assignment of the copyright (so they will own the code and you, the author, will have no further right or interest in it except possibly for minimal moral rights to be named the author). Apart from the asymmetric grant, which places the receiving entity in a privileged position in the ecosystem, the other problem with CLAs is that they’re legal agreements, so they require a lawyer to prepare them, a mechanism to ensure people sign them and a mechanism to keep all the signatures … sometimes this can be in filing cabinets if paper instead of electronic copies are used. This repository of agreements then isn’t available to anyone except the tracking entity, meaning that if someone needs to know if John Doe signed a CLA, they have to reach out and ask. In some cases the actual filing cabinets got lost as projects changed offices, so some CLA based projects don’t actually have complete records of all their CLAs.

CLAs Catalyse Community Corrosion

The main driver of community corrosion is the temptation to abuse a position of power (this temptation becomes irresistable over time because, as Baron Acton put it, “all power corrupts”). Since CLAs by their nature force a power imbalance between the contributor and the receiving entity, they act as focal points for this corrosion. Communities are very sensitive to what they see as their work being misused, so the fastest way to lose community trust is to abuse the power the CLA gave you to go against the community itself. There are numerous examples of this in the Corporate World, the most topical one today being the Elastic change from Apache 2.0 to SSPL to better monetize the code the community contributed freely to. One might think the solution to this is never to sign a CLA if the holder of the power imbalance is a corporation … i.e. only do it if the other entity is a not for profit foundation. But ask yourself, how much do you trust the people running the foundation and do its bylaws guarantee your rights in the code? Relicensing for commercial gain isn’t the only way the community could be abused, so how sure are you of the power you’re handing to a foundation which, after all, is an entity governed by some type of board, all of whom likely have political agendas, won’t be abused? To see some examples of foundations not being in tune with their community, one only has to look at the FSF and Richard Stallman. Based on all of this I conclude, like Drew DeVault, that you should never sign a CLA under any circumstances.

The bottom line is that if you do sign a CLA some decision will happen at some point that you don’t agree with but which you already gave away the power to block because of the rights imbalance inherent in the CLA you signed. Inevitably this decision will cause you to feel betrayed because your views are being ignored and as a contributor you feel you should be heard, so you’ll sour on the project. This is the community corrosion catalyst buried deep inside all CLAs.

One final thing to note is that it is possible to craft a CLA that only takes the rights it needs, in the same way the DCO does, it’s just that no project I know has ever done this. However, even if this experiment were attempted, you still need a recipient entity, plus all the infrastructure to do signing and track the signed agreements, so you’d still be better off using a lightweight DCO process.

Conclusion: For Community Small is Beautiful

The way to avoid the community corrosion problem is to do everything minimally: use a DCO to take only the rights the downstream requires and to avoid all the heavyweight recipient, signing and tracking infrastructure. Don’t set up a foundation unless you absolutely need an entity, say to handle cash, and if you must set one up, never give it any control over the project (like appointing a change control or architecture control board for instance) everything you set up should be as small as possible and clearly serve the project and its community. Above all, don’t use a CLA because it will cause a rights imbalance that corrodes your community and it will require a large amount of overhead to run.

Retro Engineering: Updating a Nexus One for the modern world

A few of you who’ve met me know that my current Android phone is an ancient Nexus One. I like it partly because of the small form factor, partly because I’ve re-engineered pieces of the CyanogneMod OS it runs to suit me and can’t be bothered to keep upporting to newer versions and partly because it annoys a lot of people in the Open Source Community who believe everyone should always be using the latest greatest everything. Actually, the last reason is why, although the Nexus One I currently run is the original google gave me way back in 2010, various people have donated a stack of them to me just in case I might need a replacement.

However, the principle problem with running one of these ancient beasts is that they cannot, due to various flash sizing problems, run anything later than Android 2.3.7 (or CyanogenMod 7.1.0) and since the OpenSSL in that is ancient, it won’t run any TLS protocol beyond 1.0 so with the rush to move to encryption and secure the web, more and more websites are disallowing the old (and, lets admit it, buggy) TLS 1.0 protocol, meaning more and more of the web is steadily going dark to my mobile browser. It’s reached the point where simply to get a boarding card, I have to download the web page from my desktop and transfer it manually to the phone. This started as an annoyance, but it’s becoming a major headache as the last of the websites I still use for mobile service go dark to me. So the task I set myself is to fix this by adding the newer protocols to my phone … I’m an open source developer, I have the source code, it should be easy, right …?

First Problem, the source code and Build Environment

Ten years ago, I did build CyanogenMod from scratch and install it on my phone, what could be so hard about reviving the build environment today. Firstly there was finding it, but github still has a copy and the AOSP project it links to still keeps old versions, so simply doing a

curl https://dl-ssl.google.com/dl/googlesource/git-repo/repo > ~/bin/repo
repo init -u -u git://github.com/CyanogenMod/android.git -b gingerbread --repo-url=git://github.com/android/tools_repo.git
repo sync

Actually worked (of course it took days of googling to remember these basic commands). However the “brunch passion” command to actually build it crashed and burned somewhat spectacularly. Apparently the build environment has moved on in the last decade.

The first problem is that most of the prebuilt x86 binaries are 32 bit. This means you have to build the host for 32 bit, and that involves quite a quest on an x86_64 system to make sure you have all the 32 bit build precursors. The next problem is that java 1.6.0 is required, but fortunately openSUSE build service still has it. Finally, the big problem is a load of c++ compile issues which turn out to be due to the fact that the c++ standard has moved on over the years and gcc-7 tries the latest one. Fortunately this can be fixed with

export HOST_GLOBAL_CPPFLAGS=-std=gnu++98

And the build works. If you’re only building the OpenSSL support infrastructure, you don’t need to build the entire thing, but figuring out the pieces you do need is hard, so building everything is a good way to finesse the dependency problem.

Figuring Out how to Upgrade OpenSSL

Unfortunately, this is Android, so you can’t simply drop a new OpenSSL library into the system and have it work. Firstly, the version of OpenSSL that Android builds with (at least for 2.3.7) is heavily modified, so even an android build of vanilla OpenSSL won’t work because it doesn’t have the necessary patches. Secondly, OpenSSL is very prone to ABI breaks, so if you start with 0.9.8, for instance, you’re never going to be able to support TLS 1.2. Fortunately, Android 2.3.7 has OpenSSL 1.0.0a so it is in the 1.0.0 ABI and versions of openssl for that ABI do support later versions of TLS (but only in version 1.0.1 and beyond). The solution actually is to look at external/openssl and simply update it to the latest version the project has (for CyanogenMod this is cm-10.1.2 which is openssl 1.0.1c … still rather ancient but at least supporting TLS 1.2).

cd external/openssl
git checkout cm-10.1.2
mm

And it builds and even works when installed on the phone … great. Except that nothing can use the later ciphers because the java provider (JSSE) also needs updating to support them. Updating the JSSE provider is a bit of a pain but you can do it in two patches:

Once this is done and installed you can browse most websites. There are still some exceptions because of websites that have caught the “can’t use sha1 in any form” bug, but these are comparatively minor. The two patches apply to libcore and once you have them, you can rebuild and install it.

Safely Installing the updated files

Installing new files in android can be a bit of a pain. The ideal way would be to build the entire rom and reflash, but that’s a huge pain, so the simple way is simply to open the /system partition and dump the files in. Opening the system partition is easy, just do

adb shell
# mount -o remount,rw /system

Uploading the required files is more difficult primarily because you want to make sure you can recover if there’s a mistake. I do this by transferring the files to <file>.new:

adb push out/target/product/passion/system/lib/libcrypto.so /system/lib/libcrypto.so.new
adb push out/target/product/passion/system/lib/libssl.so /system/lib/libssl.so.new
adb push out/target/product/passion/system/framework/core.jar /system/framework/core.jar.new

Now move everything into place and reboot

adb shell
# mv /system/lib/libcrypto.so /system/lib/libcrypto.so.old && mv /system/lib/libcrtypto.so.new /system/lib/libcrypto.so
# mv /system/lib/libssl.so /system/lib/libssl.so.old && mv /system/lib/libssl.so.new /system/lib/libssl.so
# mv /system/framework/core.jar /system/framework/core.jar.old && mv /system/framework/core.jar.new /system/framework/core.jar

If the reboot fails, use adb to recover

adb shell
# mount /system
# mv /system/lib/libcrypto.so.old /system/lib/libcrypto.so
...

Conclusions

That’s it. Following the steps above, my Nexus One can now browse useful internet sites like my Airline and the New York times. The only website I’m still having trouble with is the Wall Street Journal because they disabled all ciphers depending on sha1

The Mythical Economic Model of Open Source

It has become fashionable today to study open source through the lens of economic benefits to developers and sometimes draw rather alarming conclusions. It has also become fashionable to assume a business model tie and then berate the open source community, or their licences, for lack of leadership when the business model fails. The purpose of this article is to explain, in the first part, the fallacy of assuming any economic tie in open source at all and, in the second part, go on to explain how economics in open source is situational and give an overview of some of the more successful models.

Open Source is a Creative Intellectual Endeavour

All the creative endeavours of humanity, like art, science or even writing code, are often viewed as activities that produce societal benefit. Logically, therefore, the people who engage in them are seen as benefactors of society, but assuming people engage in these endeavours purely to benefit society is mostly wrong. People engage in creative endeavours because it satisfies some deep need within themselves to exercise creativity and solve problems often with little regard to the societal benefit. The other problem is that the more directed and regimented a creative endeavour is, the less productive its output becomes. Essentially to be truly creative, the individual has to be free to pursue their own ideas. The conundrum for society therefore is how do you harness this creativity for societal good if you can’t direct it without stifling the very creativity you want to harness? Obviously society has evolved many models that answer this (universities, benefactors, art incubation programmes, museums, galleries and the like) with particular inducements like funding, collaboration, infrastructure and so on.

Why Open Source development is better than Proprietary

Simply put, the Open Source model, involving huge freedoms to developers to decide direction and great opportunities for collaboration stimulates the intellectual creativity of those developers to a far greater extent than when you have a regimented project plan and a specific task within it. The most creatively deadening job for any engineer is to find themselves strictly bound within the confines of a project plan for everything. This, by the way, is why simply allowing a percentage of paid time for participating in Open Source seems to enhance input to proprietary projects: the liberated creativity has a knock on effect even in regimented development. However, obviously, the goal for any Corporation dependent on code development should be to go beyond the knock on effect and actually employ open source methodologies everywhere high creativity is needed.

What is Open Source?

Open Source has it’s origin in code sharing models, permissive from BSD and reciprocal from GNU. However, one of its great values is the reasons why people do open source aren’t the same reasons why the framework was created in the first place. Today Open Source is a framework which stimulates creativity among developers and helps them create communities, provides economic benefits to corportations (provided they understand how to harness them) and produces a great societal good in general in terms of published reusable code.

Economics and Open Source

As I said earlier, the framework of Open Source has no tie to economics, in the same way things like artistic endeavour don’t. It is possible for a great artist to make money (as Picasso did), but it’s equally possible for a great artist to live all their lives in penury (as van Gough did). The demonstration of the analogy is that trying to measure the greatness of the art by the income of the artist is completely wrong and shortsighted. Developing the ability to exploit your art for commercial gain is an additional skill an artist can develop (or not, as they choose) it’s also an ability they could fail in and in all cases it bears no relation to the societal good their art produces. In precisely the same way, finding an economic model that allows you to exploit open source (either individually or commercially) is firstly a matter of choice (if you have other reasons for doing Open Source, there’s no need to bother) and secondly not a guarantee of success because not all models succeed. Perhaps the easiest way to appreciate this is through the lens of personal history.

Why I got into Open Source

As a physics PhD student, I’d always been interested in how operating systems functioned, but thanks to the BSD lawsuit and being in the UK I had no access to the actual source code. When Linux came along as a distribution in 1992, it was a revelation: not only could I read the source code but I could have a fully functional UNIX like system at home instead of having to queue for time to write up my thesis in TeX on the limited number of department terminals.

After completing my PhD I was offered a job looking after computer systems in the department and my first success was shaving a factor of ten off the computing budget by buying cheap pentium systems running Linux instead of proprietary UNIX workstations. This success was nearly derailed by an NFS bug in Linux but finding and fixing the bug (and getting it upstream into the 1.0.2 kernel) cemented the budget savings and proved to the department that we could handle this new technology for a fraction of the cost of the old. It also confirmed my desire to poke around in the Operating System which I continued to do, even as I moved to America to work on Proprietary software.

In 2000 I got my first Open Source break when the product I’d been working on got sold to a silicon valley startup, SteelEye, whose business plan was to bring High Availability to Linux. As the only person on the team with an Open Source track record, I became first the Architect and later CTO of the company, with my first job being to make the somewhat eccentric Linux SCSI subsystem work for the shared SCSI clusters LifeKeeper then used. Getting SCSI working lead to fund interactions with the Linux community, an Invitation to present on fixing SCSI to the Kernel Summit in 2002 and the maintainership of SCSI in 2003. From that point, working on upstream open source became a fixture of my Job requirements but progressing through Novell, Parallels and now IBM it also became a quality sought by employers.

I have definitely made some money consulting on Open Source, but it’s been dwarfed by my salary which does get a boost from my being an Open Source developer with an external track record.

The Primary Contributor Economic Models

Looking at the active contributors to Open Source, the primary model is that either your job description includes working on designated open source projects so you’re paid to contribute as your day job
or you were hired because of what you’ve already done in open source and contributing more is a tolerated use of your employer’s time, a third, and by far smaller group is people who work full-time on Open Source but fund themselves either by shared contributions like patreon or tidelift or by actively consulting on their projects. However, these models cover existing contributors and they’re not really a route to becoming a contributor because employers like certainty so they’re unlikely to hire someone with no track record to work on open source, and are probably not going to tolerate use of their time for developing random open source projects. This means that the route to becoming a contributor, like the route to becoming an artist, is to begin in your own time.

Users versus Developers

Open Source, by its nature, is built by developers for developers. This means that although the primary consumers of open source are end users, they get pretty much no say in how the project evolves. This lack of user involvement has been lamented over the years, especially in projects like the Linux Desktop, but no real community solution has ever been found. The bottom line is that users often don’t know what they want and even if they do they can’t put it in technical terms, meaning that all user driven product development involves extensive and expensive product research which is far beyond any open source project. However, this type of product research is well within the ability of most corporations, who can also afford to hire developers to provide input and influence into Open Source projects.

Business Model One: Reflecting the Needs of Users

In many ways, this has become the primary business model of open source. The theory is simple: develop a traditional customer focussed business strategy and execute it by connecting the gathered opinions of customers to the open source project in exchange for revenue for subscription, support or even early shipped product. The business value to the end user is simple: it’s the business value of the product tuned to their needs and the fact that they wouldn’t be prepared to develop the skills to interact with the open source developer community themselves. This business model starts to break down if the end users acquire developer sophistication, as happens with Red Hat and Enterprise users. However, this can still be combatted by making sure its economically unfeasible for a single end user to match the breadth of the offering (the entire distribution). In this case, the ability of the end user to become involved in individual open source projects which matter to them is actually a better and cheaper way of doing product research and feeds back into the synergy of this business model.

This business model entirely breaks down when, as in the case of the cloud service provider, the end user becomes big enough and technically sophisticated enough to run their own distributions and sees doing this as a necessary adjunct to their service business. This means that you can no-longer escape the technical sophistication of the end user by pursuing a breadth of offerings strategy.

Business Model Two: Drive Innovation and Standardization

Although venture capitalists (VCs) pay lip service to the idea of constant innovation, this isn’t actually what they do as a business model: they tend to take an innovation and then monetize it. The problem is this model doesn’t work for open source: retaining control of an open source project requires a constant stream of innovation within the source tree itself. Single innovations get attention but unless they’re followed up with another innovation, they tend to give the impression your source tree is stagnating, encouraging forks. However, the most useful property of open source is that by sharing a project and encouraging contributions, you can obtain a constant stream of innovation from a well managed community. Once you have a constant stream of innovation to show, forking the project becomes much harder, even for a cloud service provider with hundreds of developers, because they must show they can match the innovation stream in the public tree. Add to that Standardization which in open source simply means getting your project adopted for use by multiple consumers (say two different clouds, or a range of industry). Further, if the project is largely run by a single entity and properly managed, seeing the incoming innovations allows you to recruit the best innovators, thus giving you direct ownership of most of the innovation stream. In the early days, you make money simply by offering user connection services as in Business Model One, but the ultimate goal is likely acquisition for the talent possesed, which is a standard VC exit strategy.

All of this points to the hypothesis that the current VC model is wrong. Instead of investing in people with the ideas, you should be investing in people who can attract and lead others with ideas

Other Business Models

Although the models listed above have proven successful over time, they’re by no means the only possible ones. As the space of potential business models gets explored, it could turn out they’re not even the best ones, meaning the potential innovation a savvy business executive might bring to open source is newer and better business models.

Conclusions

Business models are optional extras with open source and just because you have a successful open source project does not mean you’ll have an equally successful business model unless you put sufficient thought into constructing and maintaining it. Thus a successful open source start up requires three elements: A sound business model, or someone who can evolve one, a solid community leader and manager and someone with technical ability in the problem space.

If you like working in Open Source as a contributor, you don’t necessarily have to have a business model at all and you can often simply rely on recognition leading to opportunities that provide sufficient remuneration.

Although there are several well known business models for exploiting open source, there’s no reason you can’t create your own different one but remember: a successful open source project in no way guarantees a successful business model.

efitools arm 32 bit build fixed

It turned out there was a bug in gnu-efi, in the linker script.  I’ve added a local fix for this to the OBS UEFI project and filed a bug with gnu-efi on sourceforge.  The net result is that the arm 32 bit binaries are now passing most of their tests (the remaining problems may be due to faults in the UEFI environment, still investigating).  I should also have the OVMF image for arm (the ArmVirt package) building for 32 bit arm shortly.

I’ve released version 1.6.1 of efitools to make sure a new version gets rebuilt.